LSAT Targets Arizona Law School For Embracing GRE Exam

By on May 2, 2016

May 3, 2016

The University of Arizona College of Law’s decision to open admission to applicants who take the GRE in lieu of the LSAT has drawn the ire of the Law School Admission Council, Inc., which administers the LSAT test. Arizona said its choice was based on a study that convinced the school the GRE was as reliable an indicator of student readiness for law school as the LSAT. However, LSAC’s general counsel wrote to the school, saying that the new policy may violate the organization’s bylaws, which state that “substantially all of” a school’s applicants must have taken the LSAT in order for the school to have access to its admissions pipeline. If LSAC made good on its threat to expel Arizona Law from its membership, that would cut the school off from a crucial student admissions source. “We believe that your proposed action unreasonably restrains competition in the law school admissions testing market,” Arizona Law’s dean, Marc Miller, wrote in a letter to the LSAC. He told the Wall Street Journal, “It’s been a one-party system until now. … Because they’re a monopoly, they have no one to push them.”

Read the full article at:

The Wall Street Journal

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